Launched Missions

 

cp1

CP1

 

The primary missions of CP1 is a Sun Sensor donated by Optical Energy Technologies, as well as the use of a single magnetic torquer embedded within a side panel. Being the first satellite built at Cal Poly, emphasis was placed on building a progressive program in which documentation and passing knowledge from one generation of students to the next.

cp2

CP2

 

The primary missions of CP2 are an energy dissipation experiment as well as a field-test of what we have dubbed the CPX Bus. CP2 marks our first attempt at “standardizing” a CubeSat bus to enable easier integration of a wide variety of payloads. CP3, our next CubeSat, will use a slightly upgraded CP2 bus.

cp3

CP3

 

The primary mission of CP3 is to implement an attitude control system using only magnetic torquers embedded within the side panels. Attitude determination will be performed using the two axis magnetometers on each side panel.

CP4_AeroCube2

CP4

 

The primary missions of CP4 are an energy dissipation experiment as well as a field-test of what we have dubbed the CPX Bus. CP2 marks our first attempt at “standardizing” a CubeSat bus to enable easier integration of a wide variety of payloads.

CP5_iso_large

CP5

 

The primary mission of CP5 is a de-orbiting experiment using a thin-film deployable mechanism. The main goal is to identify whether the mechanism can feasibly become a practical solution for mitigating space debris on future small satellites. CP5 has launched on the ELaNa-6 OUTSat NROL-36 mission with 10 other CubeSats!

cp3

CP6

 

The primary mission of CP6 is to implement an attitude control system using only magnetic torquers embedded within the side panels. Attitude determination will be performed using the two axis magnetometers on each side panel. CP6 also contains a NRL-designed electron collection experiment.

IPEX

IPEX (CP8)

The primary mission of CP8 is to test automated data reduction and management through five cameras and a secondary payload processor. The mission was sponsored by JPL.

Exocube (CP10)

 

 

ExoCube is a space weather satellite sponsored by the National Science Foundation. It’s primary mission is to directly measure the density of Hydrogen, Oxygen, Helium and Nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Cal Poly is designing the core satellite bus, while the scientific payload is supplied by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The University of Wisconsin, Madison and Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI) are developing the scientific objectives and providing guidance for instrument development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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